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Rhino Poaching

Nola

Written by Stephanie Lisa Tara

Illustrated by Pilar Lama

Nola was a northern white rhino who lived in the San Diego Safari Park. She was sweet and gentle. Her caretakers and visitors lover her dearly. When she died peacefully on November 22, 2015, the world mourned her loss. Now only three of her species are left on earth.

This beautiful nonfiction picture book presents her story to the world. Illustrated in soft, beautiful watercolors, Nola is seen happily romping through the grass and chewing her dinner, running with the herds, and speaking with other friends in the animal park. She looks forward to her human visitors. But there is danger lurking because her species is hunted for their trunk, the other animals warn her to hide. Nola is so large that she cannot find a spot to camouflage her. She leaves her readers with the message to be grateful for what you have. Bonus features included in this book allow the reader to view real photographs of the rhino and read an interview with Nola’s zookeeper, Jane Kennedy sharing her real-life experiences in caring for Nola.

This beautiful book is recommended for preschool and early elementary age children, though the beauty of Nola’s soul and her message will resonate with readers of all ages.

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Back to School Around the World

A Look at the Back to School Practices Around the World

By mid September most of us are well settled back into the new school year, but returning to school or beginning a new one requires quite a bit of preparation each year.

No matter where you live, back to school involves an interesting set of traditions and practices. Buying back to school supplies in Brazil causes huge inflation. Those who wait to the last minute might see school supply prices rise 500% ! In Holland, many parents drive their children to school on bakfietsen, which are bikes with large boxes over the front wheel to tote kids. Children in Japan have the longest school year in the world at 250 days. Students carry supplies in hard backpacks called randoseru. Inside one will find pencil cases, origami paper and slippers to wear inside the school building. On the first day, many students bring a lunch of rice with seaweed sauce and quail eggs called fudebako, which is supposed to bring good luck. In Germany youngsters carry Schultuete, which are large paper cones filled with school supplies, small presents and sweets. Some of these cones are almost as big as the child. Israeli children bring edible letters coate

d with honey, while the older students release colorful balloons from the school windows to welcome them. The first day of school in Russia is called “Day of Knowledge.” Each child gives a bouquet of flowers to his teacher and receives a balloon in return. Russian students get to know each other well, as they remain in the same class from first to tenth grade. Indian students call their first day, Praveshanotsavam. It involves a gift exchange. Umbrellas are popular gifts, which are most appropriate for the upcoming monsoon season. North Korean students from age five stay together for eleven years wearing government regulation uniforms and studying “Communist Morality.” Their government carefully monitors the program of study for negative influences. Children in Hong Kong don’t need to worry about being late because the government puts on more public transportation services at an earlier time to handle the traffic as a new school year begins. French students consider themselves lucky to have the shortest academic year with two hour lunches, Wednesdays off, and a half day on Saturday.

 

Perhaps even more interesting are some back to school college traditions. At Elon College, an acorn is presented to freshmen. Upon graduation each student receives a small oak tree symbolizing academic growth. At Vassar College, freshmen dorms are invited to compose a song for graduating seniors. While the seniors listen, they cover the composers in condiments like ketchup or chocolate syrup. Georgetown students hold a competition on a mud and food covered quad to determine a king and queen. Reed College students host a noise parade. They yell, play instruments, bang pots and pans, and carry torches while parading though the campus. Female students at Smith College hold a costume competition wearing crazy clothes or nothing at all. Clemson students schedule a pep rally before the first football game which involves creating their own floats, a miniature Rose Bowl parade. Ohio State students turn their fun into a good cause. The Buckeython is a 5K race with a glow in the dark theme to raise money for kids who have cancer.

It does not matter where or whether you attend school, education is a life long experience so reward yourself by learning about something new and get back “into the swing of things.”

Barbara Ann Mojica, Author of the Little Miss HISTORY Travels to….nonfiction book series
Website: http://www.LittleMissHISTORY.com
EMAIL: barbara@littlemisshistory.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bamauthor
Facebook: www.facebook.com/LittleMissHISTORY

Time to Unplug the Tech

Hubert in Heaven: A high-tech angel gets his wings

Written by Barbara Roman

Hubert is a hologram in a video game being shot toward the moon. He misses the mark and finds himself in heaven instead. The Grand Master of the Transition works with newly arrived angels, assigning them tasks to achieve before earning their wings. Hubert depends on his computer. He finds himself a failure painting rainbows because he enhances the colors. The Grand Master patiently assigns Hubert a new task, that of choir director, but computer generated music from earth does not cut it in heaven. Hubert is given another job, the very important one of shining up the stars and preparing the Star of Bethlehem for Christmas. This results in the greatest failure of all. Will Hubert ever find his unique talent? Can he learn to fit in with the human inhabitants of heaven?

This book is a quick read. There are a few illustrations to assist younger children in following the tale and its lessons, but the story is more suited to middle grade readers. It serves as a reminder that each person possesses unique talents, if he is willing to work hard to develop them. The author reminds readers of what can be accomplished without computers; sometimes pulling the plug is not a bad idea.

 

Barbara Ann Mojica

LittleMissHistory.com

 

Middle Grade Mystery

Jug Valley Mysteries, HANDS UP!

Written by Anne Digby

Amy and Tim are students at Jug Valley. Together with their friends and fellow students, Ben, Ludo, and Mini, they have formed a club called Hands and Spouts. They meet regularly to solve mystery cases. One day at school, Ben accidentally kicks a football over the fence into the rector’s garden. It belongs to Charlie, a lower class man, who becomes terribly distraught. The five friends make a promise to retrieve the precious football as soon as the school day ends.

What appears to be a simple task turns thorny, when the members of the club discover the football has vanished into thin air. Howard, the rector’s son, promises to help, but the trail runs cold. These young detectives are mystified as to why a grungy, old football is so important, but when it becomes apparent that football is gone, they intensify their efforts to stop at nothing to get Charlie’s football back into his hands. Why is this football so valuable and why are so many people trying to gain possession of it? There are enough twists and turns to entice middle grade readers to keep turning pages. When the mystery is finally solved, all who have been touched by it learn valuable lessons about themselves and each other.

My only criticism is that the story begins slowly. I had not read any of the other books in the series and therefore was unfamiliar with the characters. After the first couple of chapters, the story evolved and grew more interesting. I like the fact that there is enough challenging vocabulary to stretch the minds of young readers. American readers will need to acclimate to British phrases. Recommended especially for readers in the eight to twelve age bracket.

Adventure with Anna the Virus

An Adventure With Anna the Virus

Written by Emma Gertony

Fun illustrated early chapter book for children to explain how viruses enter the body. Anna has been hiding in waiting while inside young Henry’s nose. Like her fellow adenoviruses, Anna has a round shape with spikes and is less than 200 nanometers in size. She and thousands of others like her wait for the perfect moment to travel through the air at 100 miles per hour and land on a surface like a park railing. Here they lie in wait for an unsuspecting child. Their leader, Captain Roger, calls out instructions. George places his hand on the railing; when he touches an itchy nose, the viruses seize the opportunity to slide down his larynx, hoping to eventually reach his lungs. In the meantime, Ted, who is positioned in George’s Thymus valiantly calls out to his troops, the white blood cells and mucus glands to fight off the viruses. Those viruses seem to be winning the battle until George’s body defenses of high fever and chills initiate a visit to the doctor, who prescribes medication and a regimen of good hygiene to defeat the invaders.

This book is richly and vividly illustrated making it a crossover between a picture and early chapter book. Parents of preschoolers might want to use it to explain what makes a child feel sick. Older children will enjoy the humor and the adventure story. Recommended especially for children ages four through ten. Good choice for libraries, doctor’s waiting rooms, and classrooms.

Dragons and Danger

Dragon Lightning: Dragon Dreamer Book 2

Written and illustrated by J.S. Burke

If you read Book One in this series, you probably already love the complex communities of dragons, octopi and squid that you have encountered. These beautifully described creatures introduce their readers to unique habitats in a fantasy world explained in real scientific terms. Readers become immersed in adventures, while learning about real scientific phenomena like volcanoes, lightning and glaciers.

Book Two introduces us to Drakor who is experiencing the red lightning from a volcanic eruption. He lands on a thin piece of ice. Arak, Taron and Dorali are traveling up north on a wooden skiff. They come upon the injured Drakor and rescue the ice dragon. He is mystified by these golden dragons as well as the octopi traveling with them. Each species will teach and learn from each other. The dragon communities are aware that their communities may face extinction. Their octopi friends under the sea fear underwater destruction.

Readers learn about the “might makes right” society of the ice dragons and the democratic, healing ways of the golden dragons. The peaceful octopi must use force to defend themselves against the squid. Principles of science are interwoven with fantasy and philosophy.

Smooth flowing prose accompanied by simple but elegant illustrations mark this tale as a winner for fans of science, fantasy and adventure. Widespread appeal for pre- teens, teens and adult audiences. What adventures await the dragons in Book Three?

Barbara Ann Mojica

LittleMissHistory.com

 

Perfect Picnic Celebration for Canada’s 150 or 4th of July

Picnics are a perfect way to celebrate, but how did this tradition begin?

The calendar says July and we are feeling the heat. On a sunny day, we feel the urge to get outside and relax. Of course we will probably find ourselves hungry so we might want to take along some food for a picnic. Where did the term picnic originate?

That is not such as easy question to answer. Most historians agree that picnics evolved from the traditions of outdoor feasts the wealthy classes entertained. There were medieval hunting feasts, banquets in Renaissance times, and garden parties in the Victorian era. In America picnics only go back as far as the middle of the nineteenth century.

Earliest picnics in England were medieval hunting feasts. The convention of having a feast before the hunt started as early as the fourteenth century. Participants would have eaten foods like hams, pastries, and baked meats. Picnicking outdoors, as we know it, became popular during the Victorian era. There are many examples of picnics in the writings of Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope and Jane Austen. Likewise, European painters such as Monet, Cezanne and Renoir depict many scenes of picnics.

It seems likely that the French invented the word picnic. The French word piquenique combines the French verb piquer which means to pick and the word nique which means something that is worth little or has no value. By 1800 the word appears to be widely accepted throughout Europe. The term picnic originally meant a contribution by every guest for a meal. Every invited guest was expected to show up with a dish. The success of the social gathering depended on everyone bringing food. We use the phrase “pot luck” supper to describe such a gathering in America today. Over a period of time the word picnic’s meaning shifted to a gathering that was always held outdoors in a peaceful setting rather than a a meal in which everyone needed to make a contribution. Today a picnic means an excursion that includes sharing a meal outdoors in a pleasant area like a park or garden. A picnic might include two people sharing wine and cheese or a picnic basket with sandwiches and fruit or pastries and home baked goods. It might even be a large community event like a church social or town community day. What distinguishes it from a barbeque is the fact that the meal is already prepared and ready to enjoy outdoors not one that requires the cooking outdoors.

No matter which of these outdoor pastimes you prefer, here’s hoping that the summer will bring us many opportunities to enjoy sharing food with family and friends. Bon Appetit!

Barbara Ann Mojica
Author of the Little Miss HISTORY series:
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to MOUNT RUSHMORE
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to The STATUE of LIBERTY
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to SEQUOIA NATIONAL FOREST
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to FORD’S THEATER
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to INTREPID Sea, Air & Space Museum
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to ELLIS ISLAND
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to MOUNT VERNON
Little Miss HISTORY COLORING BOOK, Volume 1
The Adventures of Little Miss HISTORY, Volume 1

WWW.LittleMissHISTORY.com TO SEE MUCH MORE AND PURCHASE BOOKS

Cuddly Puppy Care

The Puppy Place # 1 Where Every Puppy Finds a Home

Written by Ellen Miles

This is my first time reading a book in this series. I enjoyed reading this chapter book that is perfect for beginning readers who love dogs. Lizzie and Charles are two siblings who really want a dog, but their mom favors cats and feels that their family is not ready to shoulder the responsibility of caring for a dog. One day, their father, who is a volunteer fireman, rescues a golden retriever puppy from a fire. The children plead with their parents to keep the pup. When their two-year-old brother falls in love with “Goldie,” and follows her everywhere, mom reluctantly agrees to adopt the dog temporarily as a foster pup. Lizzie researchers how to train puppies and Charles helps out with socialization training. Mom insists that they advertise in the community for a permanent placement, and the children reluctantly agree. They come up with a plan to keep the pup nearby. In the end, the family is surprised at how this golden retriever has transformed them.

This chapter book is charming; it tells the story from the viewpoint of the children as well as in the first person from the viewpoint of a puppy. In the process, children learn responsibility and the proper way to care for a puppy. Recommended especially for readers ages seven through ten, but the tale can be enjoyed by all ages.