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Jokes for Kids, Just for Laughs

3-in-1 Jokes, Riddles & Tongue-Twisters for Kids

Written by Rob Hilario

 

This book contains roughly one hundred pages filled with one line jokes, riddles, and fun tongue twisters. It is written mainly for an elementary school age audience, but it would be enjoyed by kids of all ages. The book is divided into categories such as animals and pets, school and science, holidays, ghosts and monsters.

The book would provide lots of entertainment for children’s parties or fun for siblings and friends to quiz each other. Any child who loves jokes or practicing tongue twisters would enjoy this book as a gift. Recommended especially for ages six through twelve.

 

Barbara Ann Mojica
Author of the Little Miss HISTORY Book Series

A Cool Halloween

Halloween with Snowman Paul

Written by Yossi Lapid

Illustrated by Joanna Fasen

I was delighted to see a new release in the Snowman Paul series because I have previously enjoyed this author’s funny character and memorable illustrations.

This new book features a tree house on Halloween night. As visitors come upon the site, they encounter a warning sign not to come near the tree house. Who can refuse a dare on Halloween night? As the reader continues his journey three more warnings are posted. Visitors are warned of many types of danger. Trespassers might encounter space aliens, witches or ghosts.

I won’t give away where Paul fits into this picture, but readers will be urged to tell spooky stories and sing scary songs. Trick or treaters will not be disappointed.

This multicultural book is replete with large, soft and expressive watercolor illustrations that are not too scary for the youngest readers. Recommended especially for children in the three to eight year old range. Warning…adults will enjoy the book even more than the kids. Well done!

I was given a copy of this book by the author and voluntarily decided to review with my honest opinions for no compensation.

Barbara Ann Mojica, Author
www.LittleMissHistory.com

The History of Ghosts

1496752We are rapidly approaching Halloween. Time for ghosts, goblins and things that go bump in the night. Got me thinking about the history of ghosts so I did some investigating. Let’s take a quick look.

Ghosts are usually imagined as disembodied spirits. We visualize them as evanescent (quickly fading) forms. The old English word gast means a “soul, spirit or breath.” The details surrounding the word ghoul are far more ominous. The Arabic word ghul signifies a creature that eats children and corpses snatched from graves. Like ghouls goblins can be mischievous. The word goblin comes from the German word kobold. In traditional folklore a goblin is a grotesque spirit or mischievous elf who can be helpful and sing to young children. On the other hand, it might hide household items, kick people or fly into a rage when hungry.

It is difficult to tell whether the earliest records of ghosts were literary stories or actual recordings of observations of spirits. We know that the ninth century Greek poet Homer believed that ghosts were passive harmless beings. The living did not fear them or feel bothered by their presence. Upon death the spirit departed to Hades, the underworld. Priests and oracles visited caves and grottoes to acknowledge their spirits. Over time the Greeks came to believe ghosts were helpful and consoling, but at times they could be threatening if they died prematurely or came to a violent end. The Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century B.C. warned against prowling near tombs or sepulchers where the apparitions of souls who have not departed pure might be lurking.

The first written report of a haunted house is seen in the writings of Pliny the younger in the first century B.C. He wrote to his friend Lucias Sura concerning a villa in Athens that no one would rent because it was haunted by a ghost. In the middle of the night an old man with matted hair and beard shackled by irons and chains moaned never stopped moaning. Even worse, disease and death struck down anyone entering the building after dark. All of this did not deter the penniless philosopher, Athenodorus from leasing the property. On the very first night after moving in, he met and followed the apparition into the garden where it disappeared after pointing to a spot in the ground. The next day Athenodorus related his story to the local authorities who promptly dug up the spot and found the bones of a human skeleton bound in chains. The bones were given a proper burial, the house was given purification rites, and the ghost never reappeared.ghost3

By the third century A.D. Christianity had spread throughout Greece and Rome. The new religion adopted many popular beliefs especially those concerning ghosts or the afterlife. Early Christian writers like Justin Martyr acknowledged belief in the existence of the soul after death. Still other Christians argued that ghosts existed in spirit form alone. That meant after death all people would be social equals. This was a strong influence on the poor masses.

Little has changed over centuries. The question of life after death and ghostly spirits still eludes us. We are intrigued; yet most of us are well satisfied not to venture death as it is the only way to discover its answer!
Barbara Ann Mojica
Author of the Little Miss HISTORY series:
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to MOUNT RUSHMORE
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to The STATUE of LIBERTY
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to SEQUOIA NATIONAL FOREST
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to FORD’S THEATER
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to INTREPID Sea, Air & Space Museum
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to ELLIS ISLAND
Little Miss HISTORY Travels to MOUNT VERNON
www.LittleMissHISTORY.com

Book Review: The Halloween Grump

Mr. Boggarty:The Halloween Grump (Spooky Adventure for Kids 9-12)

Written by Tevin Hansen

Mr.Boggarty,pic

 

The question on the cover sets the main plot. Can Trix and her friends escape the Lime Green Ghost of Lincoln County? At first, I found the layout strange. The author chose to introduce each of the main characters in a separate chapter. Then he proceeds to explain Halloween customs in different countries. Finally, he gets to the subject of eggs and the plot that the five friends have hatched for this upcoming Halloween. Last, bit not least he sets the scene with each of their customs and moves to Mr. Boggarty’s house on Halloween night.

Trixie, Frank, Darby, Darren, and Preston crouch behind the tree in Mr. Boggarty’s front yard and prepare to ring the doorbell. When Darren “chickens out,” Trix cautiously turns the doorknob and the five friends find themselves inside. At first the house seems normal, but soon they see a lit jack-o-lantern on the table. Deciding to throw their rotten eggs inside the house, they are paralyzed with fear when the door slams shut and the lights go out.

Suddenly the fifth-graders are confronted with a bright green flying ghost. He orders them to kneel down and informs them he has just stolen the soul of Mr. Boggarty. He gives them a history lesson about the Great Depression But the worse news is yet to come. The children have been selected to be the new Demons of Lincoln County; they will be sent to school to learn how to be ruthless, evil and diabolical creatures who prey on poor farming communities like the one they live in now. The ghost’s brothers and sisters will arrive at six o’clock to whisk them away forever. As a thunderstorm rages outside the house, the five friends await their fate.

The plot has a ending with a surprise twist. Hansen takes his time building up to the main plot, but keeps the suspense going once the children arrive in the house. Middle grade students will enjoy the diversity of the characters, the humor, and the scary story line. Good choice for a Halloween party or a classroom read aloud. The dialogue is easy to read and the length of just over 130 pages is a good fit for reluctant readers.

Barbara Ann Mojica

LittleMissHistory.com