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Let’s Visit New York!

Hey Kids, Let’s Visit New York City

Written by Teresa Mills


Mills has written a travel guide that performs a dual purpose. Families who are planning a vacation or move to The Big Apple are provided a comprehensive introduction to the history, culture, and entertainment highlights that will appeal to young visitors and this just under one hundred page book can also serve as a reference for a classroom report on New York City.
Iconic architecture like the Empire State building, the Chrysler Building, the Brooklyn Bridge and the Flatiron Building are featured. Historical landmarks like The Statue of Liberty and Intrepid Sea Air & Space Museum are explored and explained. The book features recent additions to the NYC landscape like the 911 Memorial and Museum. Who can forget the tree lighting ceremony at Rockefeller City? Mills talks about Rockefeller Center and the Top of the Rock. She takes us on a walk through Central Park and Times Square and reminisces about the history of Broadway and some of its famous productions. The City is a big place and after a day of shopping along Canal Street, one will eventually need to jump on the New York subway and visit Grand Central Station. Visitors to New York City will want to take a tour or eat in one of the many ethnic neighborhoods like Little Italy or Chinatown. Perhaps a trip over the Brooklyn Bridge might entice visitors to try one of the famous Coney Island hot dogs.
Mills has it all covered, the culture, the entertainment, and the history wrapped up in an easy to read guide for middle-grade, young adult and adult members of the family. Highly recommended for any prospective visitor to the Big Apple.

To find out more about The State of Liberty and Intrepid Sea Air & Space Museum, check out my Little Miss HISTORY book series at:

http://www.LittleMissHISTORY.com

Barbara Ann Mojica

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Running the Rugged Crest

To Run The Rugged Crest

Written by Pierre De Moin

This book might best be described as a memoir or travelogue. The author developed a love of sports and the outdoors from a very young age. After graduating high school he traveled to Alaska where he lived off the land using Outward Bound skills. After spending most of his adult life in California hiking and pursuing outdoor adventures in his spare time, he decided to hike The Three Gun Trail in the Sandia Mountains of New Mexico.

As the author narrates the adventure. readers learn about the vegetation at each level and the types of wildlife that inhabit them. DeMoin carries on some interesting conversations with these creatures. The author discusses the clothing, equipment, and mindset needed to be successful on the trail run. The photos that document each step in the journey are a nice touch. They allow the reader to participate in the experience.

Barbara Ann Mojica

LittleMissHistory.com

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50 Events from World War I

World War I in 50 Events

Written by James Weber

The author has taken a chronological/event-based approach to narrating the events of World War I. This book is divided into four main sections. The introduction discusses the groundwork leading to the outbreak of work going back to the end of the Franco-Prussian War and the enmity between France and Germany. It continues to the Battle of Mons. The next section picks up with the Russians suffering defeat at Tannenberg and ends with the British initiating military conscription. Section Three shows the tide of war changing as the Allies become actively engaged in Caporetto and concludes with the Turkish losing at Megiddo. The last section covers events from the Central Powers collapse and surrender to the signing of The Treaty of Versailles. Unfortunately, the severe terms of the peace treaty lay the groundwork for simmering tensions, the rise of dictators, and the conflicts leading up to World War II.

Each event is discussed in a few pages. Weber singles out the most important issues, including photos of battle scenes and portraits of the important players. The text is set in large font, although the illustrations are rather small. While the information is not extensive on any one particular topic, the author manages to create a rather detailed, easy to read reference study. I would recommend the book to history buffs, middle and high school students and home school parents who wish to learn about the topic.

Barbara Ann Mojica
Author of the Little Miss HISTORY Book Series

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Volcano Adventure

The Exploding Twins: A Volcano Adventure

Written by Y. and M. Leshem

Illustrated by Lucia Benito

This is a charming, hands-on book for curious, young scientists. Daniel and Allison are twins who are listening to their Aunt Melissa, who has just returned from a trip to South America. She is showing them pictures of her climb to the top of a volcano. Their interest immediately peeks when their parents ask if they would like to create a volcano of their own in the backyard. The twins eagerly jump at the opportunity.

The second part of the book explains in easy to understand text and vivid illustrations how a volcano looks and what happens when it explodes. Then the authors present the materials necessary to create an exploding volcano from ordinary household materials. Each step leads to the climax of the explosion.

This book is an effective combination of endearing characters and a recipe for a science experiment that any family can share together. I have seen this experiment done in the classroom many times and it never fails to amaze budding, young scientists. Highly recommended for elementary and middle-grade students as a good choice in the STEM category to encourage a greater awareness of science all around us for both girls and boys.

Clear the Clutter Now!

Need to get rid of the clutter in your life?

Do The Opposite Of Nothing: The Ridiculously Simple Strategy for Serious Procrastinators…

Written by Nealey Stapleton

The author spends a lot of time in her introduction explaining procrastination and how it leads to clutter. When one procrastinates, none of a person’s goals can be achieved. Stapleton then spends a chapter on each of ten methods that might be employed to enable a person to succeed at decluttering and ending procrastination. I found a few to be especially valuable for myself. To avoid a sense of overwhelming frustration, I need to set aside a small, realistic amount of time and select one task to achieve before moving on to more ambitious plans. I am also guilty of the “homeless” mistake. A successful organizer needs to establish a spot for every object and make sure that it stays there. Many of my friends and I are guilty of buying more than we need, resulting in a storage problem. Do you keep stuff for too long and procrastinate about going through those things that really have no useful purpose in your life?

There are a lot of simple things one can do to feel a sense of accomplishment and organization that will allow a more productive use of time and many of one’s important goals to be achieved. Stapleton provides a plethora of links and resources in each chapter. I must admit they do become repetitive and can slow down the flow of the book. However, I enjoyed the straightforward presentation and practical advice, which I plan to implement daily. Recommended for anyone who has too much stuff and too little time on their hands.

Barbara Ann Mojica
LittleMissHistory.com

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Paleo for Kids

Paleo for Kids Top 100 Paleo Diet Recipes for Kids

Written by Paul English

 

 

This book contains breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack recipes, although many of these are interchangeable. They are detailed, easy to follow, and nutritious choices for both children and adults. There a quite a few that I want to try. In the breakfast area, I discovered berry pancakes, Scotch eggs, and omelet cupcakes. Under lunches, pork and apple stew and pumpkin bacon hot salad look appetizing. For dinner, I might try bison and butternut chili or zucchini pizza for a unique change of pace. Passion Fruit and mango sorbet and fruit and almond soufflé have my mouth watering. While some of the recipes might be familiar, a lot of these unique combinations are certainly worth a try for picky eaters or anyone searching for a healthy, change of pace.

Electrifying America-From Thomas Edison to Climate Change

Electrifying America: From Thomas Edison to Climate Change

Written by I. David Rosenstein

The author is an engineer and lawyer who has spent more than forty years in the industry. Rosenstein begins his story in the mid-nineteenth century. He reminds readers that everyday tasks were time-consuming, back-breaking tasks before the advent of electricity. Soon electricity would transform life in the home, on the farm, in the office, in the factory, and on construction sites. Before that energy could be utilized, someone needed to invent the electric light bulb.

Thomas Edison already possessed a long list of inventions before tackling electricity. His work with the telegraph, telephone and phonograph had great potential. Unfortunately, Edison was a lot better at inventing than implementing his ideas in the business world. The fatal flaw in Edison’s direct current could be found in its limited ability to deliver electricity at any distance from a dynamo.

Nicholas Tesla had left his native Hungary to work with Edison in his lab. Edison’s insistence on using direct current led to a break when Tesla failed to convince him to consider using alternating current. Tesla left in 1885 to work independently. George Westinghouse had been experimenting with transformers to increase the voltage of alternating current over greater distances from dynamos. Westinghouse invited Tesla to use his facilities to develop a motor to use his system in factories and businesses. During the 1880’s and 1890’s, the two competing systems of AC and DC battled for supremacy in “The War of the Electric Current.”

After presenting the early history, Rosenstein moves on the powerful monopolies of the 1920’s, and the Golden Age of Electricity after World War II when the world turned back to business development on the home front. He talks about the failures of the industry in the Great Blackout in the Northeast in 1965 and traces the crises of the Oil Embargo of 1973 and the difficulties in California during the 90’s.

By the end of the 1900’s retail electric companies had begun to access electricity through a system of independent suppliers. Then the author discusses recent history and the issues leading up to climate control and the Paris accord. He ends the book by stating his opinion that a reconsideration of the concept of energy supply responding to public sentiments will likely lead to substantial changes in the future.

This story is an interesting study written by an expert in the field in layman’s terms. The concise book contains less than 150 pages and is easy to follow. Students who have an interest in history, electrical engineering and inventions would find this book a good resource. Recommended for anyone age ten or older.

Barbara Ann Mojica
LittleMissHistory.com

 

Rhino Poaching

Nola

Written by Stephanie Lisa Tara

Illustrated by Pilar Lama

Nola was a northern white rhino who lived in the San Diego Safari Park. She was sweet and gentle. Her caretakers and visitors lover her dearly. When she died peacefully on November 22, 2015, the world mourned her loss. Now only three of her species are left on earth.

This beautiful nonfiction picture book presents her story to the world. Illustrated in soft, beautiful watercolors, Nola is seen happily romping through the grass and chewing her dinner, running with the herds, and speaking with other friends in the animal park. She looks forward to her human visitors. But there is danger lurking because her species is hunted for their trunk, the other animals warn her to hide. Nola is so large that she cannot find a spot to camouflage her. She leaves her readers with the message to be grateful for what you have. Bonus features included in this book allow the reader to view real photographs of the rhino and read an interview with Nola’s zookeeper, Jane Kennedy sharing her real-life experiences in caring for Nola.

This beautiful book is recommended for preschool and early elementary age children, though the beauty of Nola’s soul and her message will resonate with readers of all ages.

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