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Poems for Kids of all Ages

It’s Crazy in Here!: Fun Poems for Fun Kids of all Ages

Written by Malia Ann Haberman

 

This is a fun book that will have even those children who would never read a poem change their minds. The author has chosen a wide variety of topics that will appeal to boys and girls. There are monsters, fleas, dragons, dogs, cats, and bedbugs. Situations, like eating leftovers, classroom pranks, and falling in love, are explored with finesse and humor.

Teachers might use this book to entice their students to explore poetry. While the book is recommended for ages five and up, I would especially recommend it to middle-grade students.

Barbara Ann Mojica
Author of the Little Miss HISTORY Book Series

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Book Review – A CONUNDRUM

NONSENSE AND NO SENSE AND SOMEWHERE IN BETWEEN Written by Cindi Walton Nonsenseandsense,pic I was not disappointed with this poetry collection. Children will delight in the variety of subjects and clever rhyme. Some of these poems address ordinary objects like lunch and rocks. Others address fears like being sick and cowering in a thunderstorm. One of the funniest poems is the very first, “Confusion.” It addresses the many complexities and anomalies of the English language.

I gave up the fight and called it a night It really didn’t matter if write wasn’t right All those words are still in my head I’ve got an idea! I’ll learn German instead!

A few of the poems deal with growing up issues like personal appearance, wanting straight hair instead of curly or “The Joy of Boys.” Some poems illustrate our deepest feelings like the loss of a loved one in “The Legacy, ” or exploring magical memories left to us by a loved one in “Grandma’s Magical Pot.” Children who have never even tried to write down their thoughts in a poem might be encouraged to do so following the simple format of the poem titled simply, “I Like.” I don’t ordinarily read the poetry genre but have to admit I really enjoyed reading these poems. Adults will have just as much reading them as a child being introduced to them for the first time. Recommended for children ages eight and up and for readers of any age who enjoy reflecting on the simple things in life.

Barbara Ann Mojica,

LittleMissHistory.com

The Poetry of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in the Civil War Era

candle star kindle insertLesson Title: The Poetry of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in the Civil War Era
Written by: Michelle Isenhoff
Length: 45-60 min.
Grade Level: 5-8
*This lesson plan, including the entire text of both poems, is available as a free pdf.

Lesson Overview:
Students will relate the experiences expressed within Longfellow’s poems to the cultural context of the Civil War era portrayed within the children’s historical novel, The Candle Star.

Introduction
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was America’s most popular poet of the nineteen century. He began his literary career in 1839 and wrote until his death in 1882, a span of years that included the American Civil War. Poetry was the primary storytelling media of the day—long before fiction and cinema overtook it. It was an age that still embraced Puritan thought and morality, which his work epitomized. His poems came across as unaffected and sincere, leading to a public image of a kindly, sympathizing, encouraging friend. His poems included his honest response to tragedy—with which so many could easily identify during the war—and simple everyday pleasures—to which a war torn nation longed to return. His popularity would decline sharply as America headed into the postmodernism and world wars of the early twenty-first century, but during Longfellow’s own lifetime he enjoyed tremendous success.

longfellow

Longfellow’s work was melodic and easy to read. He used standard forms, regular meter, and rhymed verses. They were easy to memorize in school or recite at home, which made them popular as family entertainment. Keep in mind, there was no television, no radio, not even electric lighting. Evenings were dark, quiet, and spent together as a family.

“Autumn” and “The Bridge” were both published in the volume entitled The Belfry of Bruges and Other Poems (1845). “Autumn” is a metaphor for the changes that take place in life. “The Bridge recalls the pain of personal tragedy.

Objectives:
1. Students will read, analyze, and understand two poems written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
2. Students will learn the terms simile and metaphor.
3. Students will identify mood created by word pictures within poetry.
4. Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience and identify its historical significance.
5. Students will respond to the poems and related them to their own life experience.

Preparation/Materials:
You will need a copy of Longfellow’s poems “Autumn” and “The Bridge”. Some background knowledge of Longfellow’s life and times is beneficial. Read his full biography here.

Activity:
1. Begin by asking students what they know about the American Civil War based on their reading of The Candle Star and other prior knowledge. List their responses on the board. Then ask them what it might have been like to live in such a time period. Discuss such things as the lack of modern conveniences such as electricity, the lack of modern entertainment, and the hardships of war.

2. Introduce the two poems “Autumn” and “The Bridge.” Explain that both are examples of poetry written by the very popular American poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Explain that both were written in the two decades leading up to the Civil War but that Longfellow’s works remained popular long after the war. Ask the class to consider what they know about life during the Civil War era and think about what might have made Longfellow’s work so well liked during this time period.

3. Read “Autumn” aloud to the class. (Younger students: You may want to shorten it by choosing just one stanza.)

4. Identify and define any vocabulary words then discuss the meaning of the poem. (Older students: You may wish to also discuss how the poem’s meaning can be extended to represent the changes in life, not just the weather.)

5. Introduce the idea of word pictures and explain the terms simile and metaphor. Identify some similes and metaphors within the poem and discuss how they create a mood. What mood does the poem set?

6. Ask the students how this poem might be received by people experiencing the Civil War.

7. Repeat the exercises 4, 5, and 6 with “The Bridge.”

Assessment/Culminating Activity:
Ask the students to choose their favorite of the two poems. Assign a written response that explains why they chose that particular poem. What did they like or not like about it? What kind of emotion does it provoke? Then ask students to relate it to their own life experience. How are they able to identify with the poem? What has happened in their own lives that provokes their response?